Misophonia is known as the "Hatred of Sound"

Here we hope to raise awareness, help sufferers, educate and unite
What is Misophonia?My Experience

Science of the Brain

How does the brain chemistry work? Studies have connected misophonia with tinnitus. There are similarities between misophonia and tinnitus, the sensation of ringing in the ears. Consequently, some researchers suggest that misophonia is linked to hyperconnectivity...

Symptoms and Triggers

What Happens? Misophonia, also known as selective sound sensitivity syndrome, starts with a trigger. It’s often an oral sound -- the noise someone makes when they eat, breathe, chew, yawn, or whistle. Sometimes a small repetitive motion is the cause -- someone...

Treatment Options

How do you treat it? Unfortunately no specific medications or treatments for misophonia have been found yet. Mimicking offensive sounds is an unconscious response some people have to the sounds that trigger their condition. This mimicry may enable them to handle the...

Reluctance to share

Those with misophonia can be reluctant to share their symptoms and triggers. For years I was convinced that I was the only person in the entire world that suffered from this problem. I had no idea that it had a name or that there were a very large number of people out...

My Experience

I became aware of my misophonia when I was 11 years old. It happened when my mother was pregnant with my brother. My father brought her some toast in bed and we were all sitting around the room chatting and starting our day. Then she started eating the toast. It was...